WELCOME 1780 to 1784 Pennsylvania Maps WELCOME

The end of the Revolutionary War, settled by the Treaty of Paris early in 1783, resulted in many maps published that year. Maps issued in previous years with "British colonies" or similar title words were reissued in the 1780's with "United States" in the title, and few other changes. The first map of the United States 'compiled, engraved, and printed by an American' was Abel Buell's A NEW AND CORRECT MAP OF THE UNITED STATES OF NORTH AMERICA LAYD DOWN FROM THE LATEST OBSERVATIONS AND BEST AUTHORITY AGREEABLE TO THE PEACE OF 1783, published in 1784. The map is included in Schwartz & Ehrenberg and other map histories, and shows the American flag printed on a map for the first time.

Pennsylvania was growing fast and eight new counties were created in this decade: Washington County (seat at Washinton) in 1781; Fayette County (Uniontown) in 1783; Franklin County (Chambersburg) and Montgomery County (Norristown) in 1784; Dauphin County (Harrisburg) in 1785; Luzerne County (Wilkes-Barre) in 1786; Huntingdon County (Huntingdon) in 1787; Allegheny County (Pittsburgh) in 1788; Delaware County (seat at Chester, then Media) and Mifflin County (Lewistown) in 1789.


1780.1 A NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF THE PROVINCE OF PENNSYLVANIA IN NORTH AMERICA FROM THE BEST AUTHORITIES, published in the Universal Magazine, J. Hinton, London, April 1780. The state ends just past the Susquehanna River on this map. The title is enclosed in an engraving of trees. The 'boundary line from Philadelphia run in 1739', is shown which was based upon the 1732 agreement to define the border with Maryland. This border dispute eventually resulted in the Mason & Dixon survey completed in 1768, so this map is way behind the times. The separation from Delaware is also shown. Counties are not shown, though the original county lines running northwest from Philadelphia are indicated. The magazine published maps of the other colonies with similar title around this same time and pieces of Pennsylvania are included on some of them. Longitude west from London. See page 677 of Phillips, Sellers & van Ee #1298, Phillips page 677. Blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 14 miles. Size: 12 x 14 inches.
1780.2 CARTE DES ETATS-UNIS DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE, dressee d'apres des cartes Anglaises; par M. Brion de la Tour, Ingenieur-geographe du Roi, A Paris, chez le S. Desnos, ingenieur-geographe de Sa Majeste Danoise, rue Saint Jacques, au Globe. A map of the east coast from Massachusetts to Georgia. Pennsylvania appears to have two western boundaries, an irregular boundary from west of Pittsburgh extending to Lake Erie, and another cutting off the state short of Pittsburgh. Another map that is one of the earliest to name the United States. This image is from the Library of Congress. McCorkle #780.1; Sellers & van Ee #740-41.
1780.3 CARTE DE LA NOUVELLE ANGLETERRE, NOUVELLE YORK, NOUVELLE JERSEY, ET PENSILVANIE. A map from editions of Joseph La Porte's Atlas Moderne portatif, 1780 on (McCorkle #780.2). The colonies are given strange elongated north-south boundaries. Philadelphia and Bucks County are identified. The Susquehanna River is called "Chesapeak", and the Schuylkill is the "Perquemuk." In other words, this map displays a French ignorance of the British colonies. The map was later published in Bertholon's Atlas Moderne Portitif in 1799 and that version is shown here. It differs from the original only in the cartouche. The map was bound on the right edge and originally folded, so the image is on the verso. Scale: 1 inch = 62 miles. Size: 7 x 9 inches.
1780.4 CARTE DE LA VIRGINIE ET DU MARILAND. Another map from La Porte's Atlas Moderne portatif; "Pensilvanie" is identified at the top, but nothing in the state is named. This image is the original version with the fancier cartouche. Scale: 1 inch = 62 miles. Size: 7 x 9 inches.
1780.5 CARTE REDUITE DES COTES ORIENTALES DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE... . This French sailing map of the northeast coast from the Department de la Marine just barely includes Pennsylvania, which is named on the map but not in the title. It appeared in Neptune Americo-Septentrional, Paris 1780. McCorkle #780.3; Sellers & van Ee #215-16. Image from the Heritage Map Museum by permission.
1780.6 CARTE REDUITE DES COTES ORIENTALES DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE Contenant Partie du Nouveau Jerfey, la Pen~sylvanie, le Mary~land, la Virginie, la Carolina Septentrionale, la Caroline Meridonale et la Georgie. This map of the southeast coast is a companion to the one above from Neptune Americo-Septentrional, Paris 1780. Here Pennsylvania is named in the title but only a sliver of the state appears on the map. Image from the Heritage Map Museum by permission.
  1780.7 BRITISH DOMINIONS IN AMERICA, drawn from the latest and best authorities by Thos. Kitchin, hydrographer to his Majesty. Engrav'd for Guthries new Geographical Grammer. This is a map from William Guthrie's New System of Modern Geography, London 1780, 1782. The map shows the familiar east coast from Newfoundland to Florida and west to the Mississippi. It is hardly from the "latest and best authorities" since the United States in not mentioned. Pennsylvania is shown with an irregular western boundary and with the northern boundary extending to 43 degrees. McCorkle #780.6
  1780.8 A NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF THE PROVINCE OF NEW YORK AND PART OF THE JERSEYS, NEW ENGLAND AND CANADA, shewing the scenes of our military operations during the present war. Also the new erected state of Vermont. London. Published as the Act directs. Octr. 31st. 1780. By J. Bew, Pater Noster Row. Jn. Lodge sculp. This is a magazine map from the Political Magazine. Athough not mentioned in the title, northeast Pennsylvania appears on this map with Bucks and Northampton counties named. The northern boundary is placed at about 42d 4m, or just slightly north of its present day location. McCorkle #780.9; Sellers & van Ee #176.
  1780.9 A NEW AND CORRECT MAP OF NORTH AMERICA in which the places of the principal engagements during the present war, are accurately inserted. London. Published as the Act directs. April 26th. 1780. By I. Bew, Pater Noster Row. Jno. Lodge sculp. Another map from the Political Magazine showing the usual region from Newfoundland to a cutoff Florida and west to beyond the Mississippi. The northern boundary of Pennsylvania extends to 43 degrees with an irregular western boundary that is the mirror image of the eastern. McCorkle #780.10, 783.14.
  1780.10 THE UNITED STATES OF NORTH AMERICA, WITH THE BRITISH & SPANISH TERRITORIES. A map of uncertain date that appeared in a very late edition of Herman Moll's Atlas Minor. The map first appeared in 1729, see 1729.3, and like many others was updated to include the new United States. If this date is correct, it is one of the earliest maps to name the United States. McCorkle #780.11
  1780.11 A CHART OF THE COAST OF NEW YORK, NEW JERSEY, PENSILVANIA, MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, NORTH CAROLINA, &C. Composed from the deposit of surveys of the right honourable the Lords of Trade, with soundings and nautical remarks from Lt. Jno. Knight of the navy & others. By Jos. Fred. W. Des Barres Esqr. 1780. This nautical chart appeared in several editions of Des Barres' Atlantic Neptune as listed by Sellers & van Ee #766-67. It is illustrated in Pritchard & Taliaferro #61. The southeastern tip of Pennsylvania is included, hills and valleys are shown with detailed hachures.
1780.12 A MAP OF THE LAND ABT. RED STONE AND FORT PITT, GIVEN TO ME BY CAP. CRAWFD. This is an anonymous manuscript map with annotations by George Washington done circa 1780 per Sellers & van Ee #1332. The map itself was probably prepared earlier by "Cap. Crawfd," and may date circa 1758-71. It shows the river system around Pittsburgh, located at upper right. "Crawfd" is undoubtedly Colonel William Crawford for whom Crawford County in Pennsylvania is named. He was a long time friend of Washington who survived the French & Indian War, Pontiac's Rebellion, and the Revolution, only to be burned at the stake in 1782 while leading an expedition into Ohio. This image is from the Library of Congress.
1780.13 CAMPAIGN OF MDCCLXXVI. The date of this manuscript map is uncertain. The Library of Congress, from where this image comes, dates it 1780? and that is followed here. The main map is of the middle Atlantic region with an inset of the Delaware River titled CAMPAIGN OF MDCCLXXVII. This was the British capture of Philadelphia.
  1780.14 A NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF VIRGINIA AND PART OF MARYLAND AND PENNSYLVANIA, London Publish'd as the Act directs 31st of Decr 1780. J. Bew, Pater Noster Row. Jn.o Lodge sculp. This map was published in the Political Magazine, London December 1780. It is listed in the Maryland State Archives, MSA SC 1399 -1-52, and is a companion to map 1780.8 above. A copy of this map can be seen at the Darlington Library. Only a thin strip of southern Pennsylvania is shown at the top.
  1780.15 AN ACCURATE MAP OF NEW YORK IN NORTH AMERICA, FROM A LATE SURVEY, from the Universal Magazine, London 1780. Despite the title, this typical magazine map includes a healthy chunk of northeastern Pennsylvania as well as a piece of Connecticut and New Jersey. Sellers & Van Ee #1112.
1781.1 LES ETATS UNIS DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE, CONTENANT EN OUTRE, LES ISLES ROYALE, DE TERRE NEUVE, DE ST. JEAN ET L'ACADIE; AVEC PARTIE DU CANADA, DE LA LOUISIANE ET DE LA FLORIDE. Par M. Bonne, Ingenieur-hydrographe de la Marine. Juillet, 1781. A map of the east coast from Newfoundland to Florida, which appeared in Atlas portatif a l'usage des colleges by Abbe Grenet (McCorkle #781.3; Sellers & van Ee #742). Originally folded in the middle. Longitude from Paris, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 250 miles. Size: 8.5 x 12.5 inches.
1781.2 PART OF NORTH AMERICA, CONTAINING CANADA, THE NORTH PARTS OF NEW ENGLAND AND NEW YORK; WITH NOVA SCOTIA AND NEWFOUNDLAND. J. Cary sculp. Published Novr. 24, 1781, by I. Fielding No. 23 Pater noster Row (McCorkle #781.5). Pennsylvania only barely appears on the bottom of the main map and only because its northern boundary is set just past 43 degrees. An inset titled "Supplement for the Lakes of Canada" shows the Great Lakes and also includes a named Pennsylvania. There was a later edition of this map "Published Augst. 29th 1785 by I. Fielding..., J. Lodge sc." which is the one shown here. It is identical to the earlier one. According to McCorkle, the earlier map appeared in Complete Geographical Dictionary by John Seally, London 1783-84; and the later one appeared in editions of Guthrie's Universal Geography Improved.
  1781.3 CARTE DU CANADA OU DE LA NOUVELLE FRANCE... Revue et augmentee en 1781. A Paris chez De Zauche successeur des Sre. De l'Isle et Buache... Ph. Buache P. G. de d. l'A. R. de S. Gendre de l'Auteur. This is a very late issue of a map originally by De'Lisle, see map 1703.1, reveiwed and augmented in 1781 as the inscription says. McCorkle #781.7
1781.4 LA VIRGINIE, PENNSILVANIE, NOUVELLE ANGLETERRE, et autres pays fesant partie des possessions Angloises, en Amerique. Suivant les dernieres observations. Par J. Bte. Nolin. 1781. This map, extending from Maine to the Chesapeake and west to include Lake Michigan, is from Nolin's Atlas general a l'usage des colleges et maisons d'education, Paris 1783 (McCorkle #781.9). The map is way out of date; a boundary line confines the English colonies to the coast; "F. Duquene" is named along with "Fort Francois" on the upper Allegheny. It appears made as if the French & Indian War never occurred. Another edition of the atlas in 1791 contained this same map. This copy has later color, some loss along the center, and is closely trimmed to the neat line. Scale: 1 inch = 120 miles. Size: 8 x 10 inches.
1781.5 PARTIE OCCIDENTALE DE LA VIRGINIE, PENSYLVANIE, MARYLAND, ET CAROLINE SEPTLE. LA RIVIERE D'OHIO, Par Hutchins. Paris Le Rouge, 1781. This is Le Rouge's version of Hutchins' western territories map 1778.14. Phillips page 677. This image is from the Library of Congress.
  1781.6 (Delmarva Peninsula) This is an untitled manuscript map prepared by Robert Alexander, a loyalist, that found its way into the papers of General Henry Clinton. Southeastern Pennsylvania is included. It is illustrated in Papenfuse & Coale.
1781.7 CARTE DES ENVIRONS DU FORT PITT ET DE LA NOUVELLE PROVINCE INDIANA Dediee A. M. Franklin. This map comes from the French edition of Thomas Hutchins' A Topographical Description of Virginia..., with the French title Description topographique de la Virginie, de la Pensylvanie, du Maryland et de la Caroline Septentrionale: contenant les rivières d'Ohio, Kenhawa, Sioto, Cherokée, Wabash, des Illinois, du Mississipi, &c publieé par Thomas Hutchins. It was translated and published by George Le Rouge in Paris. It shows the region from Fort Pitt south to Kentucky and from the Allegheny Front west to the Muskingum River. The "Indiana" in the title refers to today's West Virginia. This image is from Winsor (1899).
  1781.8 A MAP OF MARYLAND WITH PART OF VIRGINIA AND PENSYLVANIA. This map from the December 1781 Scots Magazine, Andrew Bell engraver, shows most of Maryland, all of Delaware, eastern Virginia, southeast Pennsylvania, and southern New Jersey. The title is in the top margin. Listed in Heritage Map Museum CD and in the Maryland State Archives.
1782.1 PARTIE OCCIDENTALE DU CANADA, CONTENANT LES CINQ GRANDS LACS, AVEC LES PAYS CIRCONVOISINS. PAR M. BONNE, INGENIEUR-HYDROGRAPHIC DE LA MARINE. 'LIV XV. XVI. ET XVII.' appears at upper left, 'NO. 45' at upper right. Rigobert Bonne (c1729-95) was successor to Bellin as Royal Hydrographer. This map was part of Atlas de toutes les parties connues du globe terrestre accompanying Abbe Raynal's Histoire philosophique, and shows the Great Lakes area. The map (see Fort Duquesne) was well behind current events. The companion map of the northeast, which is better known, is shown below. Sellers & van Ee #173. Originally folded in half, with 'Longitude du Meridien de Paris' at bottom, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 120 miles. Size: 8 x 12.5 inches.
1782.2 CARTE DE LA PARTIE NORD, DES ETATS UNIS, DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE, NO. 47 LIV XVII ET XVIII, by Rigobert Bonne, also from Atlas de toutes les parties connues du globe terrestre. The map depicts the east coast from Viginia to Maine and west to Ohio. Fort Duquesne and Fort Necessity are marked. There were several versions of this map circa 1782-85 (McCorkle #782.1; Sellers & van Ee #744) and there is a companion map showing the southern states '...PARTIE SUD...'. This is one of the first maps to carry the name United States, but in French 'Etats Unis.' Longitude is west from Paris at the bottom and east from Ferro at the top. Blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 65 miles. Size: 9.75 x 14 inches.
  1782.3 CARTE GENERALE DES TREIZE ETATS-UNIS & INDEPENDENTS DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE d'apres Mr. Bonne, ingenieur hydrographe de la Marine de France. 1782. H. Klockhoff sculp Amst. A map of the east coast, the depiction of Pennsylvania is much like that in the map above. There were several versions of this map as illustrated by McCorkle #782.2, 784.9.
  1782.4 L'ISLE DE TERRE-NEUVE, L'ACADIE, OU LA NOUVELLE ECOSSE, L'ISLE ST. JEAN, ET LA PARTIE ORIENTALE DU CANADA. Par M. Bonne, ingr. hydrographe de la Marine. Another map from Atlas de toutes les parties connues du globe terrestre that extends the coverage of the northeast to Newfoundland. Pennsylvania just makes it onto the western edge. Several versions are illustrated in McCorkle #782.3; also Sellers & van Ee #172.
1782.5 CARTE DE LA PENSYLVANIE ET DU NOUVEAU JERSEY. ECHELLE, by Rigobert Bonne or possibly Brion de la Tour, Plate 6 believed to be from Essaishistoriques politiques sur les Anglo-Américains, Par M. Hilliard d'Auberteuil ... A Bruxelles, 1781-82. Pennsylvania boundaries are shown by line color from about 39d 45m to 42d. The western boundary is just west of the Allegheny ridge and east of Fort Pitt, with the west marked as Indian country. Many early towns and forts are identified. The outline coloring is probably later. Phillips page 678. Longitude west from Paris at top, east from Ferro at bottom, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 31 miles. Size: 9.25 x 13 inches.
  1782.6 CARTE DE LA NOUVELLE YORK, y-compris les terres cedees du N. Hamp-Shire, sous le nom d'Etat de Vermont. Vermont declared itself independent from New Hampshire in 1777, but was not admitted as a state until 1791. This map includes eastern Pennsylvania on the west but nothing in the state is named. The map is attributed to Brion de la Tour from Essais historique et politique... by d'Auberteuil, and is a companion to map 1782.5 above. McCorkle #782.5.
1782.7 CARTE DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE, DEPUIS LA BAYE D'HUDSON JUSQU'AU MISSISSIPI: POUR SERVIR AUX EFFAIS HIFTORIQUES ET POLITIQUES SUR LA REVOLUTION DE CETTE PARTIE DU MONDE. A map from Essais Historique et Politique... by D'Auberteuil. This map is usually attributed to Louis Brion de la Tour as his name appears on other maps in the Essais. Pennsylvania is shown extending to 43 degrees with an uneven western border. The map extends beyond the neat line at top and bottom and displays the region from southern Labrador to a misshapen Florida; and extending west to the Mississippi. McCorkle #782.6; Sellers & Van Ee #179. Longitude west from Paris; blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 120 miles. Size: 16 x 15 inches.
1782.8 PART OF NORTH AMERICA, COMPREHENDING THE COURSE OF THE OHIO, NEW ENGLAND, NEW YORK, NEW JERSEY, PENNSYLVANIA, MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, CAROLINA & GEORGIA. J. Cary sculpt Published Jany. 19 1782, by I. Fielding No. 23 Paternoster Row. This map comes from the Complete Geographical Dictionary by John Seally circa 1783-84. It is a copy of the 1755 de Vaugondy map, see 1755.20, and shows the northeast with an inset of the Carolinas. The same plate was used in later geographies as mentioned by McCorkle #782.9. This map is a companion to map 1781.2 above and both were published together. Scale: 1 inch = 110 miles. Size: 8.5 x 11.5 inches.
  1782.9 A NEW MAP OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE IN NTH. AMERICA, drawn from the latest authorites by Thos. Kitchin geor. hydrographer to his Majesty. Engraved for Millar's New Complete & Universal System of Geography. The source of this map of the east from Newfoundland to Florida and west to the Mississippi is given in the title. There is an inset of southern Florida. The map is out of date, Pennsylvania is shown extending to 43 degrees with an irregular western boundary that is the mirror image of the eastern. This same geography contains a page with five small maps titled VARIOUS PLANS AND DRAUGHTS OF CITIES, TOWNS, HARBOURS &C. The cities are New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Charlestown (SC) and Havanna. McCorkle #782.10; Sellers & van Ee #180.
  1782.10 NAUWKEURIGE KAART VAN DE XIII PROVINTIEN DER VEREENIGDE STAATEN VAN NOORD AMERICA. Te Amsterdam bij Allart en Holtrop. P. Mol sculps. J. C. Roeder fec: et delin. A map from Nieuwe Reize door Noord-Amerika in den jaare 1781 by Abbe Robin 1782. It shows the east from Nova Scotia to Georgia and west to the Mississippi. Pennsylvania extends to 43 degrees with an irregular western boundary; the southern states extend to the Mississippi. McCorkle #782.12
  1782.11 A NEW & ACCURATE MAP OF THE PROVINCE OF CANADA, IN NORTH AMERICA; from the latest and best authorities. London Published as the Act directs, 31st. July 1782 by J. Bew, Pater Noster Row. Political Mag. July 1782. A magazine map which extends south to 40 degrees to include almost all of Pennsylvania, whose northern boundary extends to 43 degrees. Several towns and rivers in the state are named. McCorkle #782.13; Sellers & van Ee #181.
  1782.12 BRITISH AMERICA from the best authorities by J. Young Geog. Printed for John Ainslie land surveyor & engraver Edinr. and William Faden St. Martins lane Lond. Published as the Act directs 1st. Jany. 1782. This small scale map shows all of eastern North America with nothing identified; the states and cities are noted by letters which apparently refer to accompanying text, from A New Atlas by Young. See map 1783.22 below. McCorkle #782.15
1782.13 COTE DE YORK-TOWN A BOSTON: MARCHES DE L'ARMEE. This is a manuscript map of the east coast showing the march of Comte de Rochambeau's army from New England to Yorktown and back again. It includes eastern Pennsylvania as shown in this detail from the Library of Congress. Sellers & van Ee #743, Phillips page 678. An untitled printed version of this map appeared in Francois Soules' Histoire des troubles de l'Amerique Anglais, published in Paris in 1787.
1782.14 CAMP A PHILADELPHIE LE 31 AOUST 16 MILLES DE CHESTER. Le 1re. Septembre Sejour. In Amerique campagne. 1782. A French manuscript map from Rochambeau's army which was camped near Philadelphia in 1782. Rochambeau published an atlas of camp maps in 1782 titled Amerique Campagne containing about 45 maps, the atlas is in the Library of Congress from where this image of the Philadelphia camp comes. A map of a camp at Chester is also in the atlas which contains about 40 such maps, all now online at the LOC. Sellers & van Ee #1350, Phillips page 678. M. P. Snyder in Figures 66,67 illustrates two maps of the Philadelphia area in the papers of (at Princeton Library) , and attributed to, Louis-Alexandre Berthier circa 1781 which very much resemble these maps from Rochambeau's atlas. Also see Docktor #281B5, #281B5.01, #281R3, #281R3.01 - 03, #282R1, #282R1.01 - 03.
  1782.15 LE TREDICI COLONIE UNITE DELL'AMERICA SETTENTRIONALE Per Servire Alla Storia Dell' Anno 1781. This Italian map is listed in MapForum.Com , Issue 1, as from Storia Politica Dell'Anno circa 1782.
  1782.16 AMERICA SEPTENTRIONALIS COLONIIS IN INTERIOREM VIRGINIAM DEDUCTIS &c. surriptibus Iohannim Michaelim Probst Aug Vin 1782. This map, seen at auction, is a copy of Schreibers' map of 1741 of the eastern United States. Probst has a different title cartouche, but otherwise the map is essentially unchanged.
1782.17 CARTE DE LA PARTIE DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE QUI COMPREND LES POSSESSIONS ANGLAISES. Hist. Univ. Part. Mod. Tome 116 Page 134. This map was seen at auction attributed to Louis Brion de la Tour and dated circa 1782, probably because it names the new Etats Unis. It covers the region from Greenland south to the Chesapeake and west to Lake Superior. The intent is to show "Possessions Anglaises", or Canada, but the coverage extends far enough south to include all of Pennsylvania which is named along with Philadelphia. The map is certainly French and from Brion's time, and apparently from a book with histoire universelle in the title; but no likely source is known. Longitude west from "de l'isle de Fer", blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 300 miles. Size: 8.75 x 10 inches.
  1783.1 THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA WITH THE BRITISH POSSESSIONS OF CANADA, NOVA SCOTIA, AND NEWFOUNDLAND, divided with the French; and the Spanish territories of Louisiana and Florida according to the preliminary articles of Peace signed at Versailles the 20th of Jany. 1783. London. Printed for R. Sayer and J. Bennett, Map and Printsellers, No. 53 Fleet Street, as the Act directs, 9th February. 1783. This is an example of an older map (1755.5) reissued with a new title containing United States; followed by later printings, see MapForum.Com , Issue 1 and McCorkle #783.1, 794.1; Sellers & van Ee #752.
  1783.2 BOWLES'S NEW POCKET MAP OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: the British possessions of Canada, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland with the French and Spanish territories of Louisiana and Florida...., Printed for & sold by the Proprietor Carington Bowles... 1783. Another example of an older map (1768.3) reissued with United States in the title. There were several later editions, see MapForum.Com , Issue 1, and McCorkle #783.3, 784.1, 795.1; Sellers & van Ee #745.
1783.3 CARTE DES ETATS-UNIS D'AMERIQUE, ET DU COURS DU MISSISSIPI; redigee d'apres differentes cartes et relations Anglaises..., composee par le Sr. Brion de la Tour... . This map shows the region from Nova Scotia to a cutoff Florida and west to beyond the Mississippi. Pennsylvania's western boundary is pushed into Ohio and its northern boundary appears undefined. This image is a 1784 version from the Library of Congress. McCorkle #783.4, 784.2, 787.2; Sellers & van Ee #746.
  1783.4 AN ACCURATE MAP OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA WITH PART OF THE SURROUNDING PROVINCES agreeable to the Treaty of Peace of 1783. By Ino. Cary. London, published as the Act directs, Augt. 6, 1783, by John Cary, map & printseller, No. 188, the corner of Arundel Street, Strand. This is a map of the eastern United States from Maine to a cutoff Florida and west to beyond the Mississippi. The northern boundary of Pennsylvania appears to extend to Lake Ontario, there is no western boundary. The map can be seen at the Darlington Library. McCorkle #783.5; Sellers & van Ee #747.
  1783.5 A NEW MAP OF THE UNITED STATES OF NORTH AMERICA with the British Dominions... on that continent &c. By Samuel Dunn, Mathematician; Improved from the Surveys of Cap.t Carver. London, Printed For Rob.t Sayer & Jn.o Bennett, N.o 53, Fleet Street, As The Act Directs, Oct. 9 1783. This map is from Dunn's Atlas of the Mundane System, 1783. This is a reissue of map 1774.4 with a new title and changes showing the creation of the Unites States; it was reissued with minor changes in 1786 and 1794. McCorkle #783.6, 794.5.
  1783.6 CARTE GENERALE DES ETATS UNIS DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE avec les limites de chacun des dits Etats... par J. B. Eliot. This is a reissue of map 1777.6 with a new title. McCorkle #783.7; Seller & van Ee #749.
1783.7 ETATS-UNIS DE L'AMERIQUE SEPLE. avec le Canada et la Foride. This map is No. 26 from the Petit Atlas Moderne... by Rigobert Bonne, Paris 1783. It shows the United States from Maine to Florida and west to the Mississippi. Pennsylvania's northern boundary extends to 43 degrees; the western boundary follows the Ohio south to below the 40th parallel. "Ft. Duquesne" is named but not Pittsburgh. A table at lower right gives the capitols of the states. A 1793 version was published in an atlas by Delamarche. McCorkle #783.8; Sellers & van Ee #183. Longitude west from Paris, blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 225 miles. Size: 10 x 7 inches.
  1783.8 THE UNITED STATES OF NORTH AMERICA, with the British and Spanish territories..., Wm. Faden 1783. This is a reissue of map 1777.5 by Faden with a new title. There were several subsequent issues with revisions. An excellent reproduction of the 1793 version is shown in van Ermen; and can also be seen at the Darlington Library, which also has the 1796 version. McCorkle #783.9, 785.6, 793.1, 796.7.
1783.9 REMARQUES SUR LA NAVIGATION DE TERRE-NEUVE A NEW-YORK AFIN D'EVITER LES COURRANTS ET LES BAS-FONDS AU SUD DE NANTUCKETT ET DU BANC DE GEORGE. A Paris ches Le Rouge... . This is Benjamin Franklin's famous map of the Gulf Stream which includes the eastern coast from Newfoundland to Florida. Pennsylvania and the other states are named. According to McCorkle (#783.10, 786.3, 789.7), who illustrates three versions, Franklin sent a copy of his chart to the French marine office, and when he returned to Philadelphia in 1785 he carried this French chart with him. This map is also illustrated and discussed in Pritchard & Taliaferro #62. An earlier version of Franklin's chart of the Gulf Stream appeared on a circa 1768 map of the Atlantic Ocean which included both North America and Europe, and so is not listed here; it is shown in Pritchard & Taliaferro. The image here is the 1786 version A CHART OF THE GULF STREAM published by the American Philosophical Society, Vol 2. Pl. 5, with "A letter from dr. Benjamin Franklin. Containing sundry maritime observations. August, 1785," and text titled "Remarks Upon the Navigation from Newfoundland to New York, In order to avoid the Gulph Stream." Wheat & Brun #721; Phillips page 592. Image from the Heritage Map Museum CD by permission.
1783.10 MAP OF THE UNITED STATES IN NORTH AMERICA: with the British, French and Spanish dominions adjoining, according to the Treaty of 1783. By Thos. Kitchin Senr. hydrographer to his Majesty. Published by T. Cadell according to Act of Parliament May 1st. 1783. This is a map of the eastern United States from Newfoundland to a cutoff Florida and west to the Mississippi. Pennsylvania's northern boundary extends to 43 degrees and the western boundary is a mirror image of the eastern. The map appeared in Philosophical and Politcal History by Abbe Raynal, London 1783 and later editions. An image can be seen at MapForum.Com , Issue 1. McCorkle #783.11. This image is from the Library of Congress.
1783.11 ETATS-UNIS DE L'AMERIQUE divises en 13 provinces avec leurs limites, suivant le Traite de paix fait le Janvier 1783. Par Lamarche geogr? This map shows the eastern United States from Newfoundland to a badly drawn Florida and west to the Mississippi. It goes beyond the neat line at top and bottom. Pennsylvania extends to 43 degrees with a western boundary into Ohio. The map shown in McCorkle #783.12 carries the attribution "Par Lamarche Geogr?" and is from an unknown source. The image shown here is the exact same map but lacking the attribution and presumably published a little later. The dating on the map refers to the Treaty of Paris ending the Revolution and not the date of publication. Longitude west from Paris at bottom, east from Ferro at top; blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 250 miles. Size: 7.5 x 9 inches.
  1783.12 CARTE DU CANADA QUI COMPREND LA PARTIE SEPTENTRIONALE DES ETATS UNIS D'AMERIQUE... par Guillaume Del'Isle... Revue et augmentee en 1783... . This is a very late reissue of map 1703.1 retitled to include Etats Unis; it extends south to 40 degrees and Pennsylvania appears at the bottom. McCorkle #783.13; Sellers & van Ee #182.
  1783.13 PART OF NORTH AMERICA, COMPREHENDING THE COURSE OF THE OHIO, NEW ENGLAND, NEW YORK, NEW JERSEY, PENNSYLVANIA, MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, CAROLINA & GEORGIA. J. Lodge sc. Publish'd Augst. 29th 1783 by J. Fielding No. 29 Pater Noster Row. There is an inset titled Supplement to Carolina. The map appeared in The Lady's Encyclopedia by John Seally, London 1788. McCorkle #783.15
  1783.14 CARTE DE LA NOUVELLE REPUBLIQUE DE L'AMERIQUE OU LES TREIZE PROVINCES UNIES contenant: 1. New Hampshire, 2. Massachusetsbaye, 3. Rhode-Island, & 4. Connecticut, 5. La Nouvelle York, 6. Nouvelle Jersey, 7. La Pensilvanie, 8. Les comtes de Newcastle, Kent, et Sussex sur la Delaware, 9. Mariland, 10. La Virginie, 11. La Caroline Septentrionale, 12. La Caroline Meridionale, et 13. la Georgie, par les freres Lotter a Augsbourg. This is a new map by Lotter with the enumerated title modeled on a previous one, map 1776.10. This map broadens the coverage to west of the Mississippi with many Indian names. Pennsylvania's northern boundary stops at 42 degrees and the western boundary follows the Allegheny River. McCorkle #783.16
  1783.15 A MAP OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, as settled by the Peace of 1783 Published Decr. 1, 1783, by I Fielding, Pater-Noster Row. European Magazine. This map is from the European Magazine of November 1783, and also appeared in History of the War with America... by John Andrews, London 1785, with the date changed. It shows the United States from Maine to Georgia and west to the Mississippi. Pennsylvania extends to 43 degrees with an irregular western boundary. It can be seen at the Darlington Library. McCorkle #783.17; Sellers & van Ee #755.
  1783.16 CARTE GENERALE DES COLONIES ANGLOISES DANS L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE pour l'intelligence de la guerre presente. D'apres des manuscrit Anglais par J. B. Nolin... Par R. Phelipeau... 1783. This map of the eastern United States, with insets of Chesapeake Bay and southern Florida, is an anomaly for the time as it does not identify the United States. It has the same name as a 1779 map that was a reissue of a 1777 map, but is a different map; see map 1777.8. McCorkle #783.18; Sellers & van Ee #751.
  1783.17 NORTH AMERICA INCLUDING THE UNITED STATES AND THEIR BOUNDARIES, agreeable to the Peace, of 1783. Published June 1st. 1783, by J. Fielding No. 23 Paternoster-Row. This map comes close to exceeding the regional bounds for inclusion as it extends past northern Labrador and east to include the Azores. However, it contains portraits of Washington and Franklin in the title cartouche with a simplified depiction of the states. It is from The Polite Traveler..., London 1783. An image can be seen at MapForum.Com , Issue 1. McCorkle #783.19
1783.18 THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA laid down from the best authorities, agreeable to the Peace of 1783. Published April 3d. 1783, by the proprietor John Wallis, at his Map-Warehouse, Ludgate Street London. A map showning the region from Newfoundland to Florida and west to beyond the Mississippi; Pennsylvania extends to 43 degrees with an irregular western boundary just past Pittsburgh. The southern states extend to the Mississippi. Wallis must have had a lot of maps to need a "warehouse." There was also an untitled state of this map as listed in MapForum.Com , Issue 1, published 18 March, 1783. The map title appears as an oval in the center of a group of figures. To the left of the oval is George Washington leading Liberty; above Washington is a trumpeting angel clutching a laurel wreath. To the right is a seated figure of Benjamin Franklin writing History and accompanied by Wisdom and Justice. There is also an image of the flag, and this is one of the first maps, possibly the first, to include this image. The map is illustrated in Ristow; also McCorkle #783.21; Sellers & van Ee #754; Pritchard & Taliaferro #69. It can also be seen at the Darlington Library; and at the Library of Congress which is the image shown here.
  1783.19 (Eastern United States) An untitled manuscript map attributed to David Hartley, a British commissioner who negotiated the treaty ending the Revolutionary War. The map shows the 13 colonies with the west divided into 14 new states, each numbered. Pennsylvania extends to about 42d 30m with its southern boundary extended west to the Ohio River. It is illustrated in Brown #52 and Johnson (1974), the original is in the William Clements Library.
  1783.20 ANDREW'S NEW MAP OF THE UNITED STATES OF NORTH AMERICA, Together With Canada, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, the Floridas, West Indies, Bay of Honduras, Mosquito Shore, and Part of Terra Firma, Compiled from Lopez's 4 Sheet Map of the West Indies: Cuba, from a Spanish Manuscript: all the Sands, from Dutch & French Charts: America, from the best Surveys, and Divided according to the Treaty of Peace 1783. London, Publish'd as the Act directs, February 12th 1783 by John Andrews No.2a, opposite Air Street, Piccadilly, & John Harris, No. 3, Sweetings Alley, Cornhill. This map is listed at MapForum.Com , Issue 1.
1783.21 CARTE DES ETATS-UNIS DE L'AMÉRIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE, dressée d'après des Cartes Anglaises; Par M. Brion de la Tour, Ingénieur-Géographe du Roi. A Paris, Chez le S. Desnos, Ingénieur-Géographe de Sa Majesté Danoise, rue Saint Jacques, au Globe. This map is from Brion de la Tour's Almanach Intéressant 1783, and an image can be seen at MapForum.Com , Issue 1. It shows the east coast from Maine to Georgia and west to Lake Michigan. Pennsylvania ends at the Allegheny Front. Fort Pitt, Bedford, F. Burd, F. Venango are shown along with Philadelphia, York, Lancaster, and Chester. There are two versions, one with a printed frame and one without. Blank verso, longitude east from Paris. Scale: 1 inch = 100 miles. Size: 10.5 x 12 inches.
1783.22 THE UNITED STATES OF NORTH AMERICA WITH THE BRITISH TERRITORYS ACCORDING TO THE TREATY 1783. Published as the Act directs. This anonymous British map is a later issue of map 1782.12 above, possibly from a magazine and originally folded. The date in the title is used here as the actual date of issue is not known; it could have been issued as late as the early 1800s. The coverage extends from Labrador to Florida and west to beyond the Mississippi. All of Hudsons Bay is included. The states in New England are not differentiated and Delaware is not identified. The geographical features of the map are identical to the 1782 map, but the names of towns, the title, etc. are a later addition and show signs of at least two reworkings of the plate. Blank verso, longitude west from London. Scale: 1 inch = 320 miles. Size: 9.25 x 8 inches.
1784.1 A NEW AND CORRECT MAP OF THE UNITED STATES OF NORTH AMERICA layd down from the latest observations and best authority agreeable to the peace of 1783 humbly inscribed to his Excellency the Governor and company of the State of Connecticut by their most obedient and very humble servant Abel Buell. Newhaven published according to Act of Assembly. Since this map was sponsored by Connecticut, it shows that state's extravagant land claims to the west. This is considered the first map of the United States published in the United States. In 2010 the New Jersey Historical Society copy was auctioned and sold for over two millon dollars; the buyer has apparently donated it to the Library of Congress. The auction house located only seven known examples surviving. This image is from a modern reproduction. McCorkle #784.3; Wheat & Brun #109, 110.
1784.2 A MAP OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This map appeared in Geography Made Easy by Jedidiah Morse, New Haven 1784, considered the first geography published in the United States. Pennsylvania's northern boundary is set correctly at 42 degrees. The second edition appeared in 1790 from which the image here comes. According to McCorkle (#784.5), this map is identical to the one in the first edition except for Dolittle's name added to the plate. This version with the name first appeared in Nathan Salomon's An Astronomical Diary ... in 1785. The third edition of the Geography appeared in 1791 and it went to 18 editions up to 1816. Wheat & Brun #112. Blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 345 miles. Size: 5.5 x 5.25 inches.
1784.3 PENSILVANIAE, NOVAE-CAESAREAE, NOVI-EBORACI, AQUANISHUONIGAE, ET CANADA, BREVIS DELINEATIO, juxta itinera P. Kalm a Ludovico Evans. 1750. Aeri incisa a Fr. Akrel, cura S. Kreander, 1784. McCorkle (#784.6) speculates this map comes from a Swedish edition of Peter Kalm's Travels... see map 1771.1. It extends west as far as the Forks of the Ohio identifying "Logs T." Pennsylvania's boundaries are correctly shown. This image is from the Library of Congress. Sellers & van Ee #705.
1784.4 CHARTE UBER DIE XIII VEREINIGTE STAATEN VON NORD-AMERICA, entworfen durch F. L. Gussefeld, und herausgegeben von den Homaennischen Erben. Mit Romisch Kayserl. allergn. Freyheit Ao. 1784. There is a French title above the map LES XIII ETATS UNIS DE L'AMERIQUE SEPTENTRIONALE... . This map appeared in Homann Heirs atlases enumerating the original 13 states. It shows the eastern United States from Nova Scotia to a cutoff Florida and west to beyond the Mississippi. Pennsylvania is shown with nearly correct north and south boundaries but with an irregular western boundary following the Allegheny River. The image here is of the Pennsylvania region including a portion of the title cartouche. The coloring is probably a later addition. McCorkle #784.7; Sellers & van Ee #757. Blank verso, with the longitude (apparently) east of Ferro. Scale: 1 inch = 85 miles. Size: 18 x 22.5 inches.
1784.5 KARTE DES OESTLIECHE ODER EHEMAHLIGE ENGLISCHEN AMERIKA nach den Besitzungen und Graenzen nach dem Frieden von 1783. This map has the familiar view of eastern North America from Newfoundland to Florida and west to beyond the Mississippi; Pennsylvania extends to 43 degrees. This map comes from a German book on North America by Johan Jakob Moser titled Nord-America nach den Friedenschlussen vom Jahr 1783, published in 1784; thus the dating used here despite the date on the map. McCorkle #784.8; Sellers & van Ee #185. Longitude west from London (Westliche Laenge von London), blank verso. Scale: 1 inch = 255 miles. Size: 8.75 x 11.25 inches.
  1784.6 CARTE DES ETATS-UNIS DE L'AMERIQUE suivant le Ttaite de Paix de 1783. Dediee et presentee a s. excellence Mr. Benjamin Franklin ministre plenipotentiaire des Etats-Unis de l'Amerique pres la Cour de France, anc Presid de la conventio. de Pensilvanie et de la Societe Philosophique de Philadelphie, &c. &c. Par ... Lattre. 1784. Note the dedication to Franklin. The map shows the familar region from Newfoundland to a cutoff Florida and west to beyond the Mississippi. Pennsylvania has an irregular western boundary and extends past Lake Erie in the north. There is an inset of Florida and the cartouche is a beautiful drawing of a ship with the title on the sail. Illustrated in Ristow; McCorkle #784.10; Sellers & van Ee #750; Pritchard & Taliaferro #70.
1784.7 THE UNITED STATES according to the definitive treaty of peace signed at Paris, Septr. 3d. 1783. ... by Wm. McMurray, late asst. geogr. to the U.S. R. Scot sculp. This is a very nice map with the western territories cut up into potential states and an inset of the United States extending to the Pacific; McMurray was looking ahead. Illustrated in Ristow; McCorkle #784.11; Sellers & van Ee #758; Wheat & Brun #111. It can also be seen at the Library of Congress which is the image shown here.
1784.8 DIE VEREINIGTEN STAATEN VON NORD=AMERICA. nach der von Wm. Faden 1783 ... genau zusammengetragen von D. Sotzmann. This map, after Faden, appeared in several German histories circa 1784-85. It shows the eastern United States to beyond the Mississippi; Pennsylvania appears to extend to Lake Ontario. This image is from the Library of Congress. There was a later version published in Matthias Christian Sprengel's Historisches Taschenbuch 1785, which can be seen at MapForum.Com , Issue 1. McCorkle #784.12; Sellers & van Ee #753.
  1784.9 SKETCH OF THE SURPRISE OF GERMAN TOWN. by the American Forces commanded by General Washington. October 4th 1777; by J. Hills, Lt 23d Regt. & Asst. Engr. London, Wm. Faden, 1784. This battlefield map is illustrated on pages 122-23 of Nebenzahl & Higginbotham, and in M. P. Snyder, Figure 52. Sellers & van Ee #1346.
  1784.10 A PLAN OF PART OF THE PROVINCES OF PENSYLVANIA, AND EAST & WEST NEW JERSEY, shewing the operations of the royal army under the command of their excellencies Sir Willm. Howe & Sir Henry Clinton, from the landing at Elk River in 1777, to the embarkation at Navisink in 1778. By John Hills. London, W. Faden, June 1, 1784. Phillips page 677. Illustrated in M. P. Snyder, Figure 194. There is a manuscript map in the Clements Library dated 1779 that was apparently used as the basis for this map, see Docktor #279H6.
1784.11 (Pittsburgh) This 13.5 x 17 inch parchment manuscript map of downtown Pittsburgh sold at auction in 2005 for $55,000 to an apparently private owner. In 2009 it appeared in the listings of a New York City map dealer with an asking price of $150,000. It is the only surviving copy of the original Survey & Town Plan of Pittsburgh by George Woods, an agent for the Penns who owned the land. Three copies of the original document were known, but two were lost in the Great Fire of 1845. The third was held by Senator James Ross, who authenticated the map by deposition in an 1841 court case. A copy of the map (complete with Ross's authentification) is in the Allegheny County plat book, and subsequent real estate ownership in Pittsburgh's downtown is based on it. It shows the present downtown street arrangement with blocks laid out in individual building lots. In 1872, G. M. Hopkins published Atlas of the Cities of Pittsburgh, Allegheny, and the Adjoining Boroughs, which contained the printed copy shown here of the manuscript original.
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